Mum Died. Feeling Darker Than Blue

mum-died-bereavement-death-of-parent-grief

Which reminds me, it’s time for Paul Boakye. Paul is a playwright and the editor of Drum magazine and is apparently a seriously natty dresser. Alas, Paul’s mum died last year, and last year, he also got to visit his father’s grave in Jamaica for the first time. These things left him feeling, understandably, alone.1)Thoughts on bereavement, loneliness, childhood, home, and the death of a parent. Darker Than Blue is written

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On Being a “Big Man” in Ghana

On Being a Big Man in Ghana

As a “Big Man” in Ghanaian society, the trick is to marry early. Give your wife at least two children sharp. After the firstborn, and certainly by age thirty or so, on a diet of oily, starchy foods and sweet cakes with no exercise, she should have already turned into “Big Mama.” You know, grossly overweight with everything hanging out. You may have already seen the American caricature on screen; huge sagging breasts, big belly, giant thighs and an

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Black woman, white children

Children from Village of the Damned

The young American white couple a few doors away from me are leaving Ghana today. So I’m told. “Too poor,” they say. “One minute, water no lights. Next minute, lights no water.” They’ve had enough. After five years of working to improve education in this country, where their two children were born, they’re packing their bags and hauling their doll-like offsprings back to the good ole US of A; Colorado, I believe.

I’m relaying this story to you,

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Stephanie Benson: Fairytale Princess

Kwame Nkrumah once said, “Far better to be free to govern or misgovern yourself than to be governed by anybody else.” This statement directed against the British colonial forces oppressing Ghana at the time has inadvertently come to represent a way of life for one Stephanie Benson, modern heiress to the ancient Queen of Ashanti

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The TakeOff – Inspiring Young People to Play Sport

Take Off

Baylor International Champions is an organisation based in High Wycombe in the United Kingdom who have teamed up with four media students from Orpington College to produce The TakeOff – a film that includes interviews from young people who relate their feelings about the game of cricket, what brought them to the sport and what inspires them to keep going at it in the face of funding cuts and the sell-off of school playing fields to make way for

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Big Man / Small Boy in Ghana

On Being a Big Man in Ghana

So here I am in Ghana in the middle of the night with no one to meet me because the London Heathrow to Accra flight is twelve hours late.

“Irie, Rasta man!”, says the tallest of the taxi drivers trying to handle my luggage outside the gates of Katoka International Airport.

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Black British School Daze

At twelve, my best friend was a white boy named David who lived across the road from us. He and I walked to school together, both worshipped Arsenal Football Club, went berry picking with his dad in summer, slept in each other’s house at weekends or pitched a tent in the back yard just for fun in stormy

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Nick Drake Through the Eyes of The Other

It can’t be much fun sharing your name with a famous dead rock star, but Nick Drake came to Goldsmiths’ College and he did not disappoint.

The poet, playwright and novelist turned up at short notice to replace author Jackie Kay who was sick with back trouble. You can generally tell within a minute or two if you’ll like a speaker or not and when our eyes met briefly and he smiled and nodded, I thought, I like

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